In Fahrenheit 451, what role does Professor Faber play in Montag's development as a character, and who is Professor Faber?

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Faber is a retired English professor who has been hiding in his home contemplating rebellion for some time but is too cowardly to act upon his rebellious feelings until Montag visits his home. After Montag sees Faber in the park inconspicuously reading a book of poetry, he kindly approaches Faber,...

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Faber is a retired English professor who has been hiding in his home contemplating rebellion for some time but is too cowardly to act upon his rebellious feelings until Montag visits his home. After Montag sees Faber in the park inconspicuously reading a book of poetry, he kindly approaches Faber, who gives him his address. When Montag begins to experience a change of heart and commences his intellectual pursuit, he visits Faber's home to ask for help comprehending the text he is reading. Faber ends up contributing to Montag's character development by explaining to him the importance of literature and the preservation of knowledge, as well as sharing moving arguments with Montag to counter Captain Beatty's dangerous philosophy. By interacting with Faber, accepting his advice, and having insightful conversations, Montag becomes a proponent of literature and develops into an outspoken opponent of the authoritarian regime. Faber provides Montag with the assurance that he is pursuing a valuable cause and encourages him to read literature. Montag is dramatically influenced by Faber's philosophy on literature and applies it to his life as he joins a group of hobo intellectuals who preserve knowledge in hopes of one day rebuilding a literate society.

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Apart from Clarisse, Professor Faber may be the most important influence on Montag in the novel. He guides Montag through his transformation, encouraging the protagonist to explore the books he's recovered. At one point, Faber gives Montag a transmitter that fits in his ear, so that they can have continuous communication. Unfortunately, Montag becomes overconfident and begins behaving recklessly, reading poetry to his wife and her friends, despite Faber's warnings.

Shortly thereafter, Montag is called to burn his own house. During the confrontation, Captain Beatty discovers the Seashell (transmitter), and Montag kills him and flees. He runs straight to Faber, who sets him on a path to freedom from society. He introduces Montag to a group of outsiders who hold great works of literature alive in their minds. One might argue that Faber, along with Clarisse, "saves" Montag from the crippling alienation and isolation of the society in the novel.

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