What role does family dysfunction play in Euripides's Medea, and in what ways does it show that a united family has benefits in other ways, such as government or legal systems?

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Almost everything in Medea points to family dysfunction, and the play offers very little that shows the benefits of a united family. The protagonist , Medea, and her husband, Jason, harm both each other and their children. Jason reveals his selfishness and ambition by leaving Medea for Glauce. His motives...

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Almost everything in Medea points to family dysfunction, and the play offers very little that shows the benefits of a united family. The protagonist, Medea, and her husband, Jason, harm both each other and their children. Jason reveals his selfishness and ambition by leaving Medea for Glauce. His motives are both personal and political, as he seeks to benefit from the connection to Glauce’s powerful father, Creon. Medea is so distraught at his betrayal that she determines to completely destroy their family. Creon shows his utter lack of concern for Jason’s children when he banishes them along with Medea. Jason’s concern for his children comes far too late, as he fails to save them from their mother’s determination to sacrifice them.

A glimmer of family unity could be detected in Creon’s backing up his daughter when he exiles Medea. This of limited benefit, however. Medea’s vicious revenge later incorporates this father’s concern, as he is also tainted by the poisoned robe when he tries to save his daughter.

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