What is the rhyme scheme of the poem, "Power of Hope"?

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The rhyme scheme of this poem by Leonard Rebello is, as the previous educator said, irregular. For the first half of the poem, he uses end rhyme in every other line, but does not repeat the same rhyming sound, so we see: A B C B D E F E. Then, the amount of rhyme in the poem intensifies somewhat, as we see a GHGH rhyme scheme appear, where the first line of this section rhymes with the third, and the second line rhymes with the fourth. This happens only once, and then the poet returns for four lines to the original poetic structure, where the second and fourth lines of the quatrain rhyme, while the first and third do not. Finally, the poet employs an entirely different kind of rhyme in his final quatrain—in reality, not rhyme at all, but pararhyme or assonance, where the vowel sound of a word is similar to that of the one with which it is paired. In this case, there is assonance on "heart" and "dark."

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The second, fourth, and seventh lines make use of end rhyme (rhymes: see, me, company), and the sixth and eighth lines do as well (rhymes: dead, dread). Lines nine and eleven also rhyme (rhymes: soul, goal) as do lines ten and twelve (rhymes: hand, sand). Finally, lines fourteen and sixteen rhyme (rhymes: mind, find). Thus, the poem does not possess anything approaching a regular rhyme scheme.  However, if you need someone to express the end rhyme in the poem in a straightforward way, it would go something like this: abcbdefbfghghijklkmn. Each letter corresponds to a line in the poem, and if that letter has a match or even two in the string, this indicates that those lines possess rhyming words at their ends.

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