What rhetorical device does Calpurnia use to persuade Caesar? What rhetorical device does Decius use to persuade Caesar?

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Calpurnia has been unnerved by recent events and portents, including a terrible nightmare, which all seem to point towards her husband's deadly fate. Convinced that something bad's about to happen, she pleads with Caesar not to go to the Senate on the Ides of March. Calpurnia's argument is weakened, however,...

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Calpurnia has been unnerved by recent events and portents, including a terrible nightmare, which all seem to point towards her husband's deadly fate. Convinced that something bad's about to happen, she pleads with Caesar not to go to the Senate on the Ides of March. Calpurnia's argument is weakened, however, by her use of pathos, a rhetorical device designed to appeal to the emotions. From what we know of Caesar's personality, that doesn't seem a particularly effective means of persuasion. Yet Calpurnia persists anyway:

When beggars die, there are no comets seen; The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes. (act 2, scene 2)

But Calpurnia doesn't fully understand her husband. He simply cannot act in any way that would suggest cowardice on his part; he must keep up the image of a strong and fearless leader:

Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come. (act 2, scene 2).

So Calpurnia tries a different approach. She appeals to Caesar's vanity by suggesting that he could stay at home and say that his wife was ill; this would absolve him of any charges of cowardice. Her ready-made excuse is an attempt to play up to Caesar's exalted self-image. It seems to work, as Caesar gives in, and agrees to stay at home. Although it's notable that he only does so to humor Calpurnia; he doesn't seem wholly convinced by her suggestion.

But then Decius arrives. He has a much better understanding of Caesar's psychology; he knows what motivates him to act in certain ways. Straight away, he resorts to logos, an appeal to reason, to persuade Caesar to go to the Senate. He cunningly interprets Calpurnia's dream in a positive light. For example, that statue spouting blood, far from being a bad omen, is actually a sign that Caesar's living blood will sustain the people of Rome. Mixing his appeal to reason with dollops of shameless flattery allows Decius to persuade Caesar to ignore Calpurnia's advice and prepare to make haste to the Senate for his rendezvous with destiny.

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