What is one response to the end of "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut?

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On one hand, when Harrison breaks free from his handicaps, it is a liberating moment. When he removes the dancer's handicaps and they embrace in a romantic display of dancing and grace, it is a triumphant moment. 

On the other hand, when Harrison breaks free, he names himself emperor and...

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On one hand, when Harrison breaks free from his handicaps, it is a liberating moment. When he removes the dancer's handicaps and they embrace in a romantic display of dancing and grace, it is a triumphant moment. 

On the other hand, when Harrison breaks free, he names himself emperor and selects his empress. He doesn't speak on behalf of other people who have been handicapped. He doesn't inspire a rebellion or an uprising. He only talks about himself: 

"I am the Emperor!" cried Harrison. "Do you hear? I am the Emperor! Everybody must do what I say at once!" He stamped his foot and the studio shook.

Knowing that Harrison has been fighting the oppression of the Handicapper General, it is disheartening to see him assert himself as a tyrant. He doesn't say anything about changing the way society is governed. He just immediately becomes obsessed with power. 

So, when he and his empress are killed, it is tragic. But given the selfish way he deals with his brief freedom, it doesn't seem as though his society has lost a righteous savior. Harrison wastes his opportunity and because of everyone else's handicaps, he is quickly forgotten. 

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