What request does Marc Antony make after he meets with the conspirators in Julius Caesar?

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That Marc Antony is a clever man who is also expedient is evident from the first act. For, in Scene 2, Casca describes for Brutus how on the Feast of Lupercal, on a street in Rome after Caesar has returns to Rome as the most powerful man in the Republic there...

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That Marc Antony is a clever man who is also expedient is evident from the first act. For, in Scene 2, Casca describes for Brutus how on the Feast of Lupercal, on a street in Rome after Caesar has returns to Rome as the most powerful man in the Republic there is a procession, and Marc Antony places a coronet of victory upon Caesar's head, but Caesar feigns his refusal of it. However, when Antony replaces the coronet, Casca says, "...to my thinking, he was very loath to lay his fingers off it" (1.2.247).

So, Marc Antony exhibits certain opportunistic traits since the advancement of Caesar to emperor would have also advanced him. Therefore, after Caesar is assassinated, Antony is aggrieved because he has loved Caesar, but he is also angry that his friend and mentor,has died; surreptitiously, then, he plans his revenge against Brutus and the other conspirators. So, feigning a conciliatory demeanor, he sends his servant with a message requesting that he may be granted permission to speak with Brutus. The servant asks,

If Brutus will vouchsafe that Antony
May safely come to him and be resolved
How Caesar hath deserved to lie in death...(3.1.130-133)

Using the reason that he wishes to know what Caesar has done to deserve death, Antony will then tell the conspirators that he himself is ready to die,

I do beseech ye, if you bear me hard.
Now, whilst your purpled hands do reek and smoke,
Fulfill your pleasure.

Antony requests that the conspirators kill him, but Brutus refuses, "O Antony, beg not your death of us!" He tells Antony that he and the other conspirators receive him with "all kind love, good thoughts, and reverence" (3.1.176). Nevertheless, Antony plans his revenge after he looks upon the corpse of his beloved Caesar:

And Caesar's spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry "Havoc," and let slip the dogs of war. (3.1.290-293)

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