What representations of war are developed by Galloway in The Cellist of Sarajevo?

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There's pretty much only one representation of war in this novel, and that is devastation, meaningless loss of life, terror, and heartbreak. These build into the ambiance that Steven Galloway masterfully weaves into his tale.

From early on, when our cellist watches people below queuing for bread and is shocked...

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There's pretty much only one representation of war in this novel, and that is devastation, meaningless loss of life, terror, and heartbreak. These build into the ambiance that Steven Galloway masterfully weaves into his tale.

From early on, when our cellist watches people below queuing for bread and is shocked by a mortar exploding among them, his actions are driven by a deep sadness.

The interaction between Dragan and Emina is another great example of how war is represented as tragic and meaningless. Their discussion, much of which focuses on the futility of their situation and the empty hope that some other country will intervene on their behalf, draws to a close. When Dragan attempts to cross the road, somebody tries to shoot him.

The actions of the cellist, who sits day after day playing a piece of music said to represent hope rising from the ashes, offers a melancholy representation of the nature of war.

Another message in this great book is that war changes people, and not necessarily for the better. Arrow, a member of the university sharpshooting team, has become a sniper. She is manipulated to kill people based on the premise that she would, in some twisted way, be saving lives.

In a nutshell, war is portrayed as a tragedy that invokes fear, causes unnecessary loss of life, and ultimately ruins people's lives.

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