What is the religious or moral objective in the grammer lesson of "How much/How many"?I have to say a religious or moral objective to students at the end of the lesson; e.g., the lesson of...

What is the religious or moral objective in the grammer lesson of "How much/How many"?

I have to say a religious or moral objective to students at the end of the lesson; e.g., the lesson of shopping: I said we should not waste our money because God will ask us about our money. So what do you think?

Asked on by pure

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auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I totally understand your question as well as your position, and I tend to think this is a good idea.  Sometimes, though, it's okay to revert to a more general principle if you're having trouble finding something this narrow.  The ideas given above are good ones, for sure.  When you're stuck, though, a more general idea is that God is the God of order.  Things were created with a plan in mind, and so much of our world is interconnected and orderly.  It's true that some things are complex and some are simple, but everything He created is orderly.  Sin obviously entered the picture and distorted some of that, but there is still order in the universe.  If there weren't, things like the orbit of the planets and the changing of the seasons and even the principle of sowing and reaping could not be maintained.  Grammar, despite its maze of exceptions, is an orderly discipline and practice.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

What about the passage of the New Testament of the Bible in which Jesus speaks of Judgment Day and people will be separated as the sheep from the goats

Then, the king will say to those on his righthand,  'Come blessed of my Father, take possession of kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was huntry and you gave me to eat; I was thirsty ad you gave me to drin; I was a stranger and you took me in; naked and you covered me; sick and youvisited me; I was in prison and you came to me'

After this is said to the "just," they ask how often this happened and when this occurred.  Jesus responds,

Amen, I say to you, as long as you did it for one of these, the least of my brethren, you did it for me.

Matthew25:34-40

 

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The are only two things I can think of.

One is that you could say that there are "how much" and "how many" questions that God will ask us.  He will ask us how much we have shown that we love God and our fellow people.  He could ask us how many times we have done bad things, stuff like that.  Or maybe you can say we have to know "how much" and "how many" so we can ask ourselves these questions when we are alive.

The other is just that you could ask them to think about questions about God.  Like "How much does God love us?"  That one can't be counted.  Or you can say "How many times did God send a plague on the Egyptians."

 

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