What is the relationship between kinetic energy, heat and temperature?

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Heat, temperature and kinetic energy are linked to each other. In simplest terms, when we heat a substance, its temperature rises and causes an increase in the kinetic energy of its constituent molecules. Temperature is, in fact, a measure of the kinetic energy of molecules. When we heat a substance,...

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Heat, temperature and kinetic energy are linked to each other. In simplest terms, when we heat a substance, its temperature rises and causes an increase in the kinetic energy of its constituent molecules. Temperature is, in fact, a measure of the kinetic energy of molecules. When we heat a substance, we use some energy (generally from some fuel, say coal or electricity, etc.) and part of this energy is used to increase the temperature of the material. What really happens in this process, is the transfer of energy to the constituent molecules. These molecules are always in motion and higher temperature gives them more energy and they vibrate more rapidly and hence have higher kinetic energy. One effect of this rapid motion (high kinetic energy at higher temperatures) is the expansion observed, when we heat a substance. 

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