What is the relation between Shelley's "Love's Philosophy" and the idea of romanticism?

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Throughout "Love's Philosophy" Shelley personifies certain aspects of the natural world. The mountains "kiss high heaven" and the waves "clasp each other." And "no sister-flower would be forgiven if it disdained its brother."

These are all classic examples of the Romantic attitude towards nature. For Shelley, as for the other Romantics, nature was truly alive, deeply infused as it was with an animating spirit that meant that it was more than just dead matter, an object of investigation and exploitation. To Shelley, there was no real separation between man and nature; both were joined together as part of an organic whole. This makes it easier for him to personify nature. He sees human qualities in various features of the natural world just as he sees the qualities one normally...

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