What is the relation between the behaviour of Lennie to the change in George's character when he killed Lennie?  explanation about how George can become the Round Character in the novel (from...

What is the relation between the behaviour of Lennie to the change in George's character when he killed Lennie? 

explanation about how George can become the Round Character in the novel (from good to bad character).

how the Lennie attitudes and other factors cause the changed at George.

also futher explanation about the conflicts that happen and the its symbolic to the changed at George characters

relate the themes of the novel with the changes at George character

relate how the dynamic and flat characters in the novel can cause the change at George character (behaviour)

Expert Answers
ms-mcgregor eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I think you may be misunderstanding the ending of the story. After killing Curley's wife, Lennie is terrified that he is in trouble again and George won't let him tend the rabbits on their dream ranch. He knows he is in trouble and has enough sense to run to the place George told him to go if he got in trouble. While there, he is not really insane. He is simple frightened and alone because George is not with him. He daydreams about his aunt and a giant rabbit, but those are simply signs of his intense fear. Once George arrives, Lennie returns to his old self. He asks George if he is mad at him. This is a typical ploy Lennie has used to gain sympathy from George in the past, However, George now realizes that Lennie is not safe in normal society because of his inability to control his hands. In order to prevent Lennie from suffering a painful death at the hands of Curley and the rest of the ranch hands, George takes responsibility for his friend and kills him before he can suffer. This mirrors the death of Curley's dog. When Carlson killed the dog to end its suffering, Curley said he should have shot the himself and not let a stranger do it. George learned from that incident and kills Lennie when he is occupied with the dream of the farm. George is not becoming "bad"; he is simply taking responsibliity for his friend.

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Of Mice and Men

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