In A Midsummer Night's Dream, what references in terms of languages used or events themselves take place in 3.1? This is a scene of transformation although you've probably noticed they've been...

In A Midsummer Night's Dream, what references in terms of languages used or events themselves take place in 3.1? 

This is a scene of transformation although you've probably noticed they've been occurring through the play. For instance, Lysander's affection for Hermia is transformed to Helena in the previous scene.

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durbanville | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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This scene opens with Bottom and his crew preparing for their 'play within a play'.

Although it may seem unlikely, Bottom plays a crucial role in A Midsummer Night's Dream as he

is considered by many commentators to be the central figure of the play. He is admired for his humor and his imagination.

This whole scene relates to Bottom and it is important as he 

seems to represent the common experience of humanity.

Bottom has the 'best of both worlds,' being the only one who can actively relate to and with the fairy world. Bottom is also considered to be

set apart from other mortals in the play who don't seem to share

his understanding or appreciation for art. He is a simple man but his lowly status does not stop him and, as a group 

Bottom and his fellows have a gross weight to them that serves as a counterbalance to the airy quality of the fairy world and its inhabitants.

A Midsummer Night's Dream is colored and made interesting through visual images created  and

bouquets of language flooding the audience and often taking the form of extended, sometimes overly-protracted, lists

which is never more evident in Bottom's

banter with the fairies ... just shy of being rude

It is left to the audience to decide whether the fairies even understand his  (almost sly)attempts at humor.

There is nothing difficult in the language used in this scene and its main function is to combine (as previously mentioned) the two worlds.

Refer to the eNotes study guide and navigate to the various options to get a good understanding of events in the play and their part in contributing to the play itself.

Sources:

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