What references does Churchill make in his opening to create rapport with his audience of Senators and Representatives?Based on this excerpt:(December 26, 1941) Members of the Senate and of the...

What references does Churchill make in his opening to create rapport with his audience of Senators and Representatives?

Based on this excerpt:

(December 26, 1941)

Members of the Senate and of the House of Representatives of the United States, I feel gratefully honored that you should have thus invited me to... address the Representatives of both branches of Congress.

The fact that my American forebears have for so many generations played their part in the life of the United States and that here I am, an Englishman, welcomed in your midst makes this experience one of the most moving and thrilling in my life...

I wish indeed that my mother, whose memory I cherish across the veil of years, could have been here to see me. By the way I cannot help reflecting that if my father had been American and my mother British, instead of the other way around, I might have got here on my own...

I am a child of the House of Commons. I was brought up in my father's house to believe in democracy; truth the people, that was his message. I used to see him cheered at meetings and in the streets by crowds of working men way back in those aristocratic Victorian days when Disraeli said, "The world was for the few and for the very few." Therefore, I have been in full harmony with the tides which have flowed on both sides of the Atlantic against privileges and monopoly and I have steered confidently towards the Gettysburg ideal of government of the people, by the people, for the people...

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ms-mcgregor eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Churchill creates rapport with Congress by reminding them of his American roots and the common values he shares with Americans. The mention of his mother is especially significant because she was an American. His comment that if his father had been an American he "might have gotten here on his own." also establishes rapport because he is implying his respect for Congress in his implication that, had things been different, he would have been a member of this American institution. Finally, he shares his common values of belief in democracy and rule of the common man by using a quotation from Abraham Lincoln, an American president. Thus, members of Congress felt an immediate connection to this British prime minister.