What recent war on terror do you believe to be the most controversial?What recent war on terror do you believe to be the most controversial?

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The most controversial aspect of the 2001 World Trade Center bombing known as 9/11 is the Patriot Act.  Our government responded to a group trying to destroy us for our culture by destroying our culture.  America was built on a foundation of freedom and equality, and the act is the antithesis of those.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I have to agree with the first post concerning the illegitimacy of America's second invasion of Iraq. I believe the motives of President George W. Bush were primarily personal, and he seemed bent on capturing Saddam Hussein (who had years earlier put a bounty on the head of Bush's father, the previous President George H. W. Bush). Bush assured the nation that Iraq housed weapons of mass destruction, but after the second invasion, none were found. Nor is there any evidence that the 9/11 attacks had a serious Iraqi connection.

However, I believe the most controversial war on terror at the moment is the United States' present military involvement in Libya. Although I recognize that Gaddafi's slaughter of fellow Libyans constitutes a threat to the people of North Africa, I believe that the main intention of the U.S.'s involvement is the same reason for invading Iraq: the preservation of the "black gold" that Americans find so important--OIL.

I don't think that the fighting in Libya is being billed as a war on terror, though.  Gadhaffi used to be a major terrorist threat but has not been seen that way since 9/11.  I think that this war is seen as a humanitarian mission and the controversy over it is whether it is well thought-out and likely to work.  So I would argue that the war in Iraq is much more controversial and is seen much more than the war in Libya as a "war on terror."

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I have to agree with the first post concerning the illegitimacy of America's second invasion of Iraq. I believe the motives of President George W. Bush were primarily personal, and he seemed bent on capturing Saddam Hussein (who had years earlier put a bounty on the head of Bush's father, the previous President George H. W. Bush). Bush assured the nation that Iraq housed weapons of mass destruction, but after the second invasion, none were found. Nor is there any evidence that the 9/11 attacks had a serious Iraqi connection.

However, I believe the most controversial war on terror at the moment is the United States' present military involvement in Libya. Although I recognize that Gaddafi's slaughter of fellow Libyans constitutes a threat to the people of North Africa, I believe that the main intention of the U.S.'s involvement is the same reason for invading Iraq: the preservation of the "black gold" that Americans find so important--OIL.

kapokkid's profile pic

kapokkid | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

As the previous poster pointed out, the war on terror has a number of different conflicts and the war in Iraq probably drove the most criticism and dissent but there are a number of other aspects that were controversial.  The warrantless wire-tapping could be seen as another battle that brought a large controversy out into the public discourse.

The war in Afghanistan has been far more controversial of late but only because things appear to be moving quietly (relatively) forward in Iraq and the war in Afghanistan at its outset had clearer objectives.

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The wording of the question is interesting.  The idea of multiple "wars on terror" hold different levels of controversy. I think that the war in Iraq was probably the endeavor under the banner of "war on terror" that caused a great rift in post 9/11 American society.  The war, itself, was embraced at the time.  Yet, as the objectives of the war became less apparent to the public, and as the success of it became increasingly muddled, the support for it began to wane. As casualties increased and as new evidence became apparent that the intelligence being given to the President and the reasoning given to the American public was not convergent, greater public disdain arose.  I think that these elements helped to create a situation where the war in Iraq generated more doubt, more insecurity, and greater controversy amongst the American public.

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