What were the reasons that Jo March did not want Meg to marry Mr. Brooke and how was this conflict resolved?

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We get some insight into this when Laurie tells Jo the "secret" of where Meg's glove is—that is, in Mr Brooke's pocket. We are told that Jo has anxiously been noticing that Meg is becoming a woman, and this secret "made her dread the separation which now seemed very near."...

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We get some insight into this when Laurie tells Jo the "secret" of where Meg's glove is—that is, in Mr Brooke's pocket. We are told that Jo has anxiously been noticing that Meg is becoming a woman, and this secret "made her dread the separation which now seemed very near." After this, Jo is continually checking the post and looking "woebegone" in Meg's direction in expectation of some kind of letter from Mr Brooke, betraying his feelings.

Later, when Jo explains what she knows to her mother, she says she worries that there will be "a hole in the family" if Brooke should gather together enough money to "carry [Meg] off." She is afraid that Meg will be too "absorbed" in Brooke to have any interest or time left for Jo any more. Jo also implies that, out of concern for Meg, she would rather Meg had married a rich man. Ultimately, however, it is not that Jo dislikes Mr Brooke personally. She simply does not want the family to be broken up, and she has always felt very close to and protective of Meg, although Meg is the older sister. Jo dreads having Meg taken away from her and having the fabric of their family changed forever.

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Jo does not want Meg to marry Mr. Brooke, Laurie's tutor, because she is anxious to keep everything and everyone at home, just the way it has always been. She knows that if Meg gets married, Meg will move out and begin to have a family of her own, and Jo just wants all the girls to stay young and stay home because she loves their family dynamic so much. Her concern never really gets "resolved" per se; it's just that Meg and Mr. Brooke are in love, and though Marmee and Mr. March make them wait a bit to get married (until Mr. Brooke can purchase a home in which they can live), they do eventually get married. Jo has to deal with the fact that this is the way of things: people grow up, they move on, and life changes.

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