Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

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In "Shooting an Elephant," what reasons does Orwell give for not wanting to shoot the elephant?

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Shortly after seeing the dead man's body, the British officer sends for an elephant rifle in case he is forced to defend himself against the massive beast. When the British officer finally receives the elephant rifle, a large crowd of Burmese natives begins following him in hopes of witnessing a spectacle. As the crowd gathers and grows larger, the British officer mentions that he has no intention of shooting the elephant and plans on merely using the rifle to scare the animal if necessary. When the British officer eventually discovers the elephant, it is peacefully grazing by itself, and the officer mentions that it looked "no more dangerous than a cow." The British officer immediately realizes that he should refrain from shooting the elephant for several reasons. A working...

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