What is the reasoning for an observation and asking a question when working on a science project?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Observations are an essential part of the scientific process. The empirical nature of observation entails that every physical feature, occurring patterns, or natural tendencies will be considered throughout the investigative process. As a result, the collected data will likely include more details that may enable for better conclusions and asserted...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

Observations are an essential part of the scientific process. The empirical nature of observation entails that every physical feature, occurring patterns, or natural tendencies will be considered throughout the investigative process. As a result, the collected data will likely include more details that may enable for better conclusions and asserted correlations between causative factors and their effects.

The process of asking questions through scientific inquiry is equally important. Not only do the questions guide the investigation and help you maintain the focus of it, but the answers clarify the data, making it easier to analyze it and correlate it later during the phase of conclusion. Therefore, both processes are equally effective and important as part of the investigative methodology.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team