In "A Christmas Carol", what reason does Scrooge give for not joining his nephew at Christmas?

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Of course, Scrooge first utters his famous "Bah, humbug!"  Then he asks his nephew, "What right have you to be merry?  What reason have you to be merry?  You're poor enough."

To this the nephew counters, "What right have you to be dismal? What reason do you have to be morose? You're rich enough."  Scrooge retorts that he needs to be morose because he lives in a "world of fools."  Scrooge continues,

If I could work my will...every idiot who goes about with 'Merry Christmas' on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.  He should!

The nephew is shocked by Scrooge's coldness, but Scrooge tells his nephew to keep Christmas in his own way, and he will keep Christmas in his.

jennifer-taubenheim's profile pic

jennifer-taubenheim | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

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To continue from the previous post, Scrooge tells his nephew to keep Christmas in his own way, and he will keep Christmas in his. To this his nephew replies, "But you don't keep it." Scrooge says, "Let me leave it alone then!" There is also some subtext in the novel suggesting the Scrooge is not particularly fond of the girl that his nephew chose to marry, although it does not appear that he has ever actually met her.

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