What reason does Curley's wife give for going to the bunkhouse?

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Curley's wife enters the bunkhouse with the excuse that she is looking for her husband. When she enters the bunkhouse for the first time, she says, "I’m lookin’ for Curley" before she proceeds to question George and Lennie (Steinbeck, 16). She then smiles and says hello to Slim before repeating...

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Curley's wife enters the bunkhouse with the excuse that she is looking for her husband. When she enters the bunkhouse for the first time, she says, "I’m lookin’ for Curley" before she proceeds to question George and Lennie (Steinbeck, 16). She then smiles and says hello to Slim before repeating her fabricated reason for being in the bunkhouse. Curley's wife does not actually wish to find her husband and simply enjoys flirting with the other workers. As the only female on the ranch, Curley's wife seeks attention and desperately wishes to have someone to talk to on a regular basis.

Her husband is an overbearing man, and she has a reputation for flirting with the workers on the ranch. If anything, Curley's wife wishes to avoid her jealous, authoritative husband. Curley's wife clearly enjoys the attention from the other men and continually stops by the bunkhouse to "look for Curley."

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Curley's wife is a "tart" - a slang term for a woman of dubious, possibly promiscuous behavior. In short, she's trouble, and George knows it, hence his attempting to stay away from her and counseling Lennie to do the same.

She supposedly goes to the bunkhouse to look for Curley, but this is a lie, or at least a thin excuse; she knows perfectly well where Curley is. She's really just looking for company and conversation, or rather, someone to listen to her complaints. The way she mistreats and verbally abuses the men evidences her dissatisfaction and self-loathing, and makes the men reject her presence even more vigorously. Curley's wife is very much like a child who wants any attention it can get, even if that attention is negative.

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When George and Lennie first meet Curley's wife, she enters the bunkhouse under the pretense of looking for her husband. After George tells her that Curley left a minute ago, she attempts to carry on a conversation with him but does not get far. As she leaves the bunkhouse, she greets Slim and reiterates that she is looking for Curley. Curley's wife is depicted as one of the loneliest people on the ranch and regrets marrying her pugnacious, aggressive husband. She is continually attempting to strike up conversations with the men and is in desperate need of company, which is why she continually visits the bunkhouse. She makes up the excuse that she is looking for Curley in order to avoid upsetting her husband and making the men suspicious of her presence. Unfortunately, the men on the ranch fear that speaking to her will get them fired and accuse her of flirting with them. In reality, Curley's wife simply wants someone to talk to because she is extremely lonely.

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Curley's wife first asks about her husband. Her real reason for visiting the bunkhouse is that she wants someone to talk to. The men never welcome her into their group. When she visits Crook's room she says,“I ain’t giving you no trouble. Think I don’t like to talk to somebody ever’ once in a while? Think I like to stick in that house alla time?” She admits she doesn't like her husband who “Spends all his time sayin’ what he’s gonna do to guys he don’t like, and he don’t like nobody.” Curley's wife is a lonely figure who no one will really talk to except Lennie. And that turns out to be a fatal mistake.

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