What is the relationship between Lord Emsworth and Freddie like in "The Custody of the Pumpkin"?

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In P.G. Wodehouse's "The Custody of the Pumpkin" we find a recurring topic in the Wodehouse's treatment of the filial relationships between aristocratic fathers and their sons.

This tendency is to portray them as foils of each other, and as each other's arch-enemies to an extent. This is because Wodehouse...

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In P.G. Wodehouse's "The Custody of the Pumpkin" we find a recurring topic in the Wodehouse's treatment of the filial relationships between aristocratic fathers and their sons.

This tendency is to portray them as foils of each other, and as each other's arch-enemies to an extent. This is because Wodehouse usually awards the elder aristocrats the same characteristics: Absent-minded, quirky, not very bright, too much time in their hands, too much money to spend, and a lot of power and titles.

However, the younger aristocrats fare differently. They, as a reflection of their nay-doer rich parents will also share the traits of not being too bright nor creative. However, Wodehouse goes one step further by showing them as lazy drone-types who spend their lives in limbo attending social events, having fun at the men's social club, and living off the riches of their families.

This is the exact case with Lord Emsworth and his 26 year old bachelor son, Freddie, who

[..] with the passage of the years that youth had become more and more of a problem to an anxious father.  The Earl of Emsworth, like so many of Britain's
aristocracy, had but little use for the Younger Son.
And Freddie Threepwood was a particularly trying
younger son.

In true Wodehouse fashion, the description of what Freddie means to his father is quite funny. It basically says that the father has tried to marry off Freddie to an heiress in order to basically find him "something to do". Moreover, Freddie is so useless that his father actually does better without his company. He is not that son of whom every father boasts about as the future of the family. Not at all. Freddie is literally a waster and his father is the first to acknowledge it as well as the rest of the family. This is because Freddie would always get in trouble, runs debts, and causes all kinds of crazy mischief when he visits London

There seemed, in the opinion of his nearest and dearest, to be no way of coping with the boy. If he was allowed to live in London he piled up debts and got into mischief; and when hauled back home to Blandings he moped broodingly. It was possibly the fact that his demeanor at this moment was so mysteriously jaunty, his bearing so inexplicably free from the crushed misery with which
he usually mooned about the place that induced Lord
Emsworth to keep a telescopic eye on him. Some
inner voice whispered to him that Freddie was up
to no good and would bear watching.

So Freddie and his father do not have a good relationship at all. It is all because Lord Emsworth sees his son as a waste of time and money, and because Freddie really does not do much to change that opinion of him at all.

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