What quotes are there to describe the "hollowness of the upper class" in "The Great Gatsby"?

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In The Great Gatsby, the "hollowness of the upper class" can be seen in the attitudes and behaviors of individual characters.

"Get some more ice and mineral water, Myrtle, before everybody goes to sleep."

"I told that boy about the ice." Myrtle raised her eyebrows in despair at the shiftlessness of the lower orders. "These people! You have to keep after them all the time."

In the above quote, Myrtle's reply to Tom Buchanan highlights her condescending attitude toward people of "the lower orders." Myrtle is the kind of woman who can't see past outward appearances; she is preoccupied with status and wealth.

In the quote, Myrtle tries to distinguish herself from the "lower orders" in order to reinforce her supposedly privileged position as Tom Buchanan's mistress. Tom, after all, is a very powerful and wealthy man. Myrtle's words exemplify the "hollowness" of her worldview; she's willing to commit adultery in order to attach herself to wealth and privilege. She's also quite willing to entertain an attitude of disdain toward those who fail to meet her expectations. Myrtle's attitude is indicative of that held by the "hollow" upper-class community she insists on being a part of.

For Daisy was young and her artificial world was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful snobbery and orchestras which set the rhythm of the year, summing up the sadness and...

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