What are quotes from Creon illustrating his pride in Scene 3 of Antigone?

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In the inciting action which precedes Sophocles's Antigone, the eponymous protagonist has fulfilled her religious obligation to bury the remains of her brother Polynices, slain while attempting to retake his rightful place as co-ruler of the city of Thebes. In so doing, she has broken the civil law...

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In the inciting action which precedes Sophocles's Antigone, the eponymous protagonist has fulfilled her religious obligation to bury the remains of her brother Polynices, slain while attempting to retake his rightful place as co-ruler of the city of Thebes. In so doing, she has broken the civil law against aiding an enemy and pointedly defied the decree of Creon, ruler of Thebes, that her brother's body be left to rot in the open. Creon orders Antigone to be entombed alive for this transgression. To further complicate matters, Creon's son, Haemon, is Antigone's betrothed.

In the third act (or epeisodion, in Greek tragedy), Haemon has come to beg his father to spare the life of the woman he loves. He invokes the manner in which trees that bend with the winds of winter survive, while the rigid "perish, root and branch," to describe the wisdom of mercy. But Creon's hubris is a juggernaut, riding roughshod over all obstacles. He says,

"No, whomsoever the city may appoint, that man must be obeyed, in little things and great, in just things and unjust."

And, in the rhetorical question "shall Thebes prescribe how I must rule?" Creon takes pride of place above all in the city. Finally, his pride seems especially nettled when he is defied by a woman, as he cries, "O dastard nature, yielding place to woman!"

In the aforementioned quotes, Creon ignores the wise words of his son and the Choral Leader, revealing an overweening pride which will lead only to suffering and death.

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In Scene 3 of Antigone, Creon's younger son Haimon comes to see him to persuade him to reconsider his decree and the punishment of Antigone. Haimon attempts to appeal to Creon by sharing that he respects him much as his father and ruler; however, Creon's stubborn pride gets in the way of any better judgement. For example, Creon says that "[his] voice is the one giving orders in this City!" which disregards the democratic underpinnings of the State. Haimon reminds Creon that there is no true City if the people are supposed to obey the orders of one dictatorial voice; however, Creon responds that "[t]he State is the King!" Here, Creon's pride puts him in a position in which he is no longer listening to the advice of any counsel, and although he is later warned that no wise man ever behaves in this way, Creon allows his pride to continue motivating his decisions.

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