What is a quote that shows hamartia, one that shows peripeteia and one that shows anagnorisis in Macbeth?I'm doing an essay trying to prove Macbeth was a tragic hero. These 3 words are my topics...

What is a quote that shows hamartia, one that shows peripeteia and one that shows anagnorisis in Macbeth?

I'm doing an essay trying to prove Macbeth was a tragic hero. These 3 words are my topics for the 3 body paragraphs and i need a quote, from the play, for each.

Asked on by jsaundy69

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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What a wonderful question! Here are examples of what you are looking for:

ANAGNORISIS

Let us begin with a definition of anagnorisis. This Greek term, used by Aristotle, exemplifies a time in a play where the protagonist comes to realize that something critical has happened.  This tends to include awareness and realization of the moment and the impact it will have in regard to other character's and the outcome for their life. An example of anagnorisis in Macbeth:

I'll go no more:/ I am afraid to think what I have done;/ Look on 't again I dare not. (II, ii, 51-53)

What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes!/ Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood/ Clean from my hand? No. (II, ii, 62-64).

HAMARTIA

Again, developed by Aristotle (Poetics), hamartia is seen definable in many different ways.  It can be looked at as a sin or wrongdoing.  It has also been defined in Nicomachean Ethics (again by Aristotle) as being an injury one person commits against another.

An example of hamartia in Macbeth is:

To know my deed, 'twere best not know myself (II,ii, 78)

Here, Macbeth acknowledges that the murder of Duncan's chamberlains was a wrongdoing.  He does not even wish to look at who he really is because of how wrong he knows his actions are.

PERIPETEIA

According to Dictionary.com, peripeteia is "a sudden turn of events or an unexpected reversal, especially in a literary work".  The sudden turn of events in Macbeth happens, again, when Macbeth emerges from the chamberlains’ bedroom. He realizes what he has done is wrong.  Macbeth, in he quest for the crown, realizes (only after he murders) that he is wrong in committing the murder.  Unfortunately, Macbeth must revisit this later when he questions the needed murder of Fleance and Banquo.  It seems that his first revelation was not enough.

 

 

 

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