What is a quote from Mansfield's "Miss Brill" that shows that Miss Brill is lonely?

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When an old man and old woman sit down next to Miss Brill on her "special" seat in the park, she is disappointed when they don't speak, because she

always looked forward to the conversation. She had become really quite expert, she thought, at listening as though she didn't listen, at sitting in other people's lives just for a minute while they talked round her.

This line shows that Miss Brill is so often alone, and so often without the ability to have a conversation with anyone around her, that she actually looks forward to listening to other people's conversations; for her, this feels satisfying because she has so very little interaction of her own. She cannot help but be lonely.

Soon, Miss Brill begins to think that she and everyone present are actually in a play.

Even she had a part and came every Sunday. No doubt somebody would have noticed if she hadn't been there; she was part of the performance after all.

Miss Brill thinks that "even she" has a role to play, implying that someone might think that she does not because she does not seem like an active participant in the scene. She seems to assure herself that she would be missed, making it seem as though there is certainly is some question as to whether this is the case. The implication is that she is lonely.

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There is no one quotation in this short story in which it is stated outright that Miss Brill is lonely. However, it is implied throughout. Note how, when Miss Brill is in the park, the people she is watching seem to appear in pairs—the older couple, the young couple on the bench, and even people simply walking past. Miss Brill is a "stupid old thing" on her own, who, the young girl says, "nobody wants." Miss Brill tries hard to pretend that this does not bother her, taking small pleasures in such things as her honeycake which she buys as a Sunday treat. However, as she returns to her little room with her fur—of which she is so proud, but which has been mocked by the young girl—it is as if she is symbolically returning herself to her box, just as she is returning the fur.

At the end of the story, when she puts the fur back into its box, Miss Brill "thought she heard something crying" as she sets the lid on. Of course, the fur itself is not crying, but we can infer that Miss Brill is projecting her own loneliness onto the fur, another lonely, old thing which is worse for wear and is confined, stifled and unloved.

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They did not speak. This was disappointing, for Miss Brill always looked forward to the conversation. She had become really quite expert, she thought, at listening as though she didn't listen, at sitting in other people's lives just for a minute while they talked round her.

A significant quote showing Miss Brill's loneliness is seen above. It describes for us how Miss Brill conducts her conversations: she is on the fringe and only listening in while pretending to be keeping to herself. In order for Miss Brill to even have a chance at not being lonely, she would need to engage in active conversation with the other concert attendees. The fact that she keeps isolated yet eavesdrops delicately ("She had become really quite expert, ... at listening as though she didn't listen ...") indicates her loneliness.

It must be acknowledged, though, that Miss Brill doesn't deeply feel this loneliness because of the turn of her disposition and the traits of her personality. This natural or deeply bred tendency is illustrated in her pleasure and thoughts while listening to the concert:

Now there came a little "flutey" bit--very pretty!--a little chain of bright drops. She was sure it would be repeated. It was; she lifted her head and smiled.

Nonetheless, she does feel slight stirrings caused by her loneliness, although she seems unable to identify the nature of these stirrings:

And when she breathed, something light and sad--no, not sad, exactly--something gentle seemed to move in her bosom.

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