What is a quote from The Great Gatsby on illegal business being conducted?

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In Chapter V, when Nick returns home late one night, he meets Gatsby outside. Gatsby awkwardly references Nick's job and the fact that he does not make much money as a bond salesman. Gatsby begins to vaguely allude to a little business he has "'on the side,'" and he offers Nick some kind of opportunity where he can "'pick up a nice bit of money. It happens to be a rather confidential sort of thing.'" First of all, some small service that "'wouldn't take up much'" of one's time and yet pays a lot of money is probably not on the up and up. There are precious few side gigs that one can perform that pay a bunch of money for just a little bit of work. Further, the fact that the job has to be "'confidential,'" that Nick obviously would have to keep quiet about it, is also a good indicator that it isn't legal. Otherwise, why wouldn't he be able to tell people about it? Gatsby also tries to assure Nick that he wouldn't have to interact with Meyer Wolfsheim, Gatsby's business colleague who allegedly fixed the 1918 World Series, and that's another good indicator that Gatsby's work is illegal; obviously Wolfsheim is involved in significant illegal business activity.

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In chapter seven, Tom Buchanan confronts Jay Gatsby with the information he received from a private investigator he hired to learn about Gatsby's criminal activities. Tom explains to Nick, Jordan, and Daisy that Gatsby and Meyer Wolfsheim bought small drugstores in New York and Chicago and "sold grain alcohol over the counter." Gatsby does not deny it, responding, "What about it?"

Tom threatens to carry his investigation further, implying that Gatsby and Wolfsheim have been engaged in a gambling racket and something bigger that one of his sources, Walter Chase, is afraid to divulge. Once again, Gatsby is unmoved by Tom's threats and accusations, replying, "You can suit yourself about that, old sport." He also points out to Tom that Walter Chase, though a friend of Tom Buchanan, was willing to join him in the bootlegging enterprise.

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