What is a quote from The Book Thief that describes the setting?

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The Book Thiefis a novel written by Markus Zusak. This book is the story of Liesel Meminger and her experiences during World War II. This story takes place in January of 1963 in Germany—more specifically, in the town of Molching, which is near Munich.

One quote that describes...

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The Book Thief is a novel written by Markus Zusak. This book is the story of Liesel Meminger and her experiences during World War II. This story takes place in January of 1963 in Germany—more specifically, in the town of Molching, which is near Munich.

One quote that describes the setting is:

Beyond the outskirts of Munich, there was a town called Molching ... That's where they were taking her, to a street by the name of Himmel.

This quote describes the main setting of the story because most of this novel takes place at the house on Himmel Street. Himmel Street is important to the novel because it is the location of the home that Liesel is sent to live in at the start of the book. It is here that she meets the Hubermann family, as well as Max Vandenburg and other vital characters in this story.

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The chapter titled "Arrival on Himmel Street" actually has various quotes that lead us to deduct a good sense of setting:

The book thief and her brother were traveling down toward Munich, where they would soon be given over to foster parents We now know, of course, that the boy didn't make it.

This quote places the setting in Germany, though most of the action won't be in Munich but in the fictional town of Molching.

Just as the Fuhrer was about to reply, she woke up.

It was January 1939. She was nine years old, soon to be ten.

Her brother was dead.

This additional section places the protagonist right in the center of Adolf Hitler's infamous reign of terror. Being located in Germany during this time period creates an ominous setting, reinforced by her brother's death so early in the novel.

Snow had been falling consistently, and the service to Munich was forced to stop due to faulty track work. There was a woman wailing. A girl stood numbly next to her.

We are already aware that it is January, but the cruelty of winter is vivid in this section of text. The reader is reminded through the setting yet again of the cold, hopeless mood that envelopes Liesel's world.

Beyond the outskirts of Munich, there was a town called Molching ... That's where they were taking her, to a street by the name of Himmel.

This places Liesel at the place where most of the action will occur as she arrives to stay with the Hubermanns.

Together, these sections of text provide an accurate context of the cold and ominous setting which sets the tone for the events that will follow.

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Liesel is sent to live with foster parents because her mother cannot afford to keep her. Her mother is also very sick and couldn't afford to take care of herself. Like many during those hard times in Europe, they found foster parents to take in their kids until they could get back on their feet. Both Liesel and her brother were to go to the new foster parents, but her brother died on the train ride there. Liesel soon meets Hans and Rosa Hubermann who live on Himmel Street in Molching, Germany. The description of the street where Liesel plays out a few years of her childhood is as follows:

"The buildings appear to be glued together, mostly small houses and apartment blocks that look nervous. There is murky snow spread out like carpet. There is concrete, empty hat-stand trees, and gray air" (27).

A few pages later, a more detailed description of Liesel's new home is described as a small house with only a few rooms. They were lucky to have their own kitchen, but they had to share an outhouse with a few other neighbors. They also had a basement which would become a home for Max, a Jew in hiding. The basement, however, was not the "adequate depth" for hiding during an air raid in 1942 and 1943.

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