What quotations depict the role of fate or destiny in Macbeth?

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In Macbeththe witches are harbingers of fate and destiny, and they lay the thematic foundation of the play at the end of the first scene in Act 1 when they say:  "Fair is foul, and foul is fair."  They warn the audience that not all will be as...

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In Macbeththe witches are harbingers of fate and destiny, and they lay the thematic foundation of the play at the end of the first scene in Act 1 when they say:  "Fair is foul, and foul is fair."  They warn the audience that not all will be as it seems and that those who are seemingly good will end up proving to be evil.  As events unfold, Macbeth questions the role that fate and destiny play in his life.  In Act 1 Scene 3, Macbeth says, "If Chance will have me King, why, Chance may crown me, without my stir."  At this point, Macbeth resolves that if he is supposed to become king, he will become so without having to exert his free will to intervene in the course of events.  Later, Macbeth's greed and ambitious drive cause him to go against this resolve, and he tries to take fate into his own hands.  Lady Macbeth also plays her role in thwarting fate by telling Macbeth to "look like th' innocent flower, but be the serpent under't."  She asks him to play false to hide his intention to kill Duncan, thereby falling into the paradox that the witches have set up in the first scene.

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