What are the pronouns used in this poem?

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Pronouns are grammatical substitutes for proper nouns; if "Caledon" is my proper noun, "I", "me" or "myself" would be pronouns.

Some of the pronouns in this poem are no different than our common speech today. They include;

  • I and myself; "But swift as dreams, myself I found"
  • they; "And they...

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Pronouns are grammatical substitutes for proper nouns; if "Caledon" is my proper noun, "I", "me" or "myself" would be pronouns.

Some of the pronouns in this poem are no different than our common speech today. They include;

  • I and myself; "But swift as dreams, myself I found"
  • they; "And they all dead did lie"
  • she, he and his; "He struck with his o'ertaking wings", "How fast she nears and nears!"
  • we and it; "We hailed it in God's name."
     
     
    Other examples are not as common in modern speech;
     
    1.   thee, thy and thou; "I fear thee and thy glittering eye", "Fear not, fear not, thou Wedding-Guest!"
     
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