What is the process involved in a water treatment plant after visiting the plant?  I want to get information for my project on the summer homework it is written that 'prepare a project on water...

What is the process involved in a water treatment plant after visiting the plant?

 

I want to get information for my project on the summer homework it is written that 'prepare a project on water treatmant plant-the process involved ( after visiting the plant ).

Asked on by hahrhshh

1 Answer | Add Yours

bandmanjoe's profile pic

bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

There are multiple steps involved in the treatment of waste water to return it to its pristine, usable quality as fresh water.  I will list a few of them here, you can consult the resource I have listed for you for a more detailed listing.

The first step would be to separate out any visible trash, any solid materials, any sediment that is not dissolved in the water.  This process is known as sedimentation, and involves the use of screens, filters, and settling tanks to remove the solid waste.  The sediment can range from plastic bottles, to trash, to raw sewage.

The next step would be to decontaminate the water of any microscopic organisms that would make the water unsafe to consume by animals or humans.  This is done by a variety of steps, using chlorination, fluoridation, and ultraviolet radiation.  This kills any bacterial infestations that would make people sick if they drank the water.

The next step would be to "soften" the water, by removing dissolved elements like calcium and magnesium.  "Hard water" is difficult to use with soaps for cleaning puposes, and has an undesirable taste for human consumption.  The removal of undesirable tastes and odors would also be involved in this process.

The final step would be that of aeration, used to dissolve oxygen in the water.  This is important to the fish and aquatic population, as well as insuring the freshness of the recycled water.  After this last step, the water is ready to be delivered either commercially to homes and businesses, or reintroduced into the natural waterways in nature.

We’ve answered 318,915 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question