What is the problem in the book No More Dead Dogs by Gordon Korman?

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The problem in the book is that the main character, Wallace Wallace, doesn't want to lie. He doesn't like the book he had to write a report on because he's tired of books where dogs die. Rather than accepting his opinion, his teacher decides to give him detention.

Wallace realizes...

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The problem in the book is that the main character, Wallace Wallace, doesn't want to lie. He doesn't like the book he had to write a report on because he's tired of books where dogs die. Rather than accepting his opinion, his teacher decides to give him detention.

Wallace realizes that sometimes you can lie to help others, but also that he wasn't wrong about the death of the dog in the book. Others also dislike that aspect of the story, which is why the drama club is willing to adjust the ending of the play to keep Shep alive. As Wallace says,

The dog always dies. Go to the library and pick out a book with an award sticker and a dog on the cover. Trust me, that dog is going down.

Mr. Fogelman, the teacher, is a big fan of the book Wallace had to review. He's directing a stage play that he adapted from the book. This is another part of why Wallace's negative review had such a large impact.

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The problem for the character of Wallace Wallace in No More Dead Dogs is that he is a little too honest for his own good. Wallace is an 8th-grade student in Mr. Fogelman's English class, and one of his class assignments is to write a report on the book Old Shep, My Pal. Wallace detests the book and pens a ruthlessly honest—if too brief—paper. He later discovers the true depth of Mr. Fogelman's regard for Old Shep, My Pal, when he learns that it is Fogelman's favorite book. His horror is further compounded when he learns that Fogelman will be directing the play production of Old Shep, My Pal. The final indignation is when Wallace realizes he has earned an incomplete for his book report, which means daily detention until he can submit a rewrite that Fogelman will accept. Also, detention interferes with football practice.

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Wallace's problem is his unwavering policy of not lying. His parents divorced over his father's constant lying, so in a childish, single-minded decision, he decided that "honesty is not just the best policy; it's the only policy". Though this does not sound like a problem, the reader learns of many occasions when his truthfulness embarassed his mom. As an adolescent, his truthfulness hurts him both in the classroom, on the football field, and in his friendships. The first conflict is with his English teacher who gives him an F on a book review of "Old Shep, My Pal." Wallace thinks the book stinks because the dog dies at the end. Wallace is suspended from the football team until he writes a "satisfactory" book review for Mr. Fogelman. As the reader knows, that's not going to happen.

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The problem occurs when Wallace Wallace is asked by his English teacher to write a book report on the book, "Old Shep, My Pal," and Wallace quite honestly expresses his displeasure with the book. While Mr. Fogelman defends it and cites the book's surprise ending, Wallace won't budge, and in fact further angers Mr. Fogelman by saying any award-winning book like that ends with the dog dying. Wallace is assigned detention until he creates a book report more to Mr. Fogelman's liking.

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