What is the practical cure for tennis elbow?Tennis elbow is a rare problem affecting some people and doctors normally fail to prescribe effective medicine or theropy. There could be an answer and...

What is the practical cure for tennis elbow?

Tennis elbow is a rare problem affecting some people and doctors normally fail to prescribe effective medicine or theropy. There could be an answer and solution to the problem in the international knowledge bank. Hence the query.

Asked on by seshasai

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boblawrence's profile pic

boblawrence | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

Practical cure for Tennis Elbow:

 

Tennis elbow results from overuse of the muscles of the forearm during repetitive use, primarily in sports such as tennis and golf, but can also occur under other circumstances, for example as an occupational hazard in carpenters from hammering.  The overuse causes painful inflammation of the lateral epicondyle of the humerus or arm bone (bony bump on the side of the elbow).

 

Once the injury has occurred, it will not get better until the elbow has been rested for two to three weeks.  During the day or two following the onset of tennis elbow, ice rubs, localized massage of the tender area and analgesics such as aspirin or Tylenol are helpful.  Icy analgesic salves for topical application to the sore area are, in my opinion, non-effective and a waste of money.

 

When symptoms have resolved and the player wishes to resume tennis, she should take precautionary measures as follows:

 

1.  Consult a tennis professional regarding your tennis grip and correctness of grip size.

 

2.  Have your racquet restrung at the lowest pressure recommended for your particular racquet.

 

3.  During play, wear a pressure strap over your upper forearm, with pressure point placed approximately 1-½ inches below the tender epicondyle.

 

4.  Consider purchase of a Tennex -brand shock-absorbing wrist band (see link for availability at Amazon for $ 24.95).  This device consists of encapsulated mercury on a Velcro band.  It acts as a damper to absorb impact vibrations before they get to the elbow area.

 

5.  Consider taking a preemptive dose of two aspirins or other similar analgesic immediately prior to play.

 

6.  Once you are able to play without pain, use only the Tennex wristband.  There should be no need for aspirin.

 

Good luck and enjoy the wonderful sport of tennis!

drjjpdc's profile pic

drjjpdc | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

Tennis elbow is not a rare problem, first of all. It is a very common overuse syndrome. It is an inflammation of the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, which occurs from too frequent use of the dorsal muscles of the forearm.

The practical cure is rest and ice therapy. Acupressure and point tender massage over the inflammed area to break up the scar tissue inherent to this condition are also very helpful. Electric modalities can also be used. 

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