What is Pony's observation about people when they are asleep in The Outsiders?

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Ponyboy values his sleep, though his troubles cause his own brothers to lose much of theirs in Susan E. Hinton's novel, The Outsiders. Because of the Curtis' small house, Pony shares a bed each night with his brother, Soda; Darry has the other bedroom to himself. The brothers have...

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Ponyboy values his sleep, though his troubles cause his own brothers to lose much of theirs in Susan E. Hinton's novel, The Outsiders. Because of the Curtis' small house, Pony shares a bed each night with his brother, Soda; Darry has the other bedroom to himself. The brothers have a morning rule: Whoever awakes first cooks breakfast, while the other two boys do the dishes. On Pony's first morning back after the fire, he wakes first and realizes that Soda must have removed his shirt before falling asleep with his own clothes on.

Asleep, he looked a lot younger than going-on-seventeen, but I had noticed that Johnny looked younger when he was asleep, too, so I figured everyone did. Maybe people are younger when they are asleep. 

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