What is the political point of view and argument of "War is Kind" by Stephen Crane?

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In his poem "War is Kind," Stephen Crane takes an ironic point of view toward war in order to make his contradictory argument about the kindness of war.Not only is there irony , but there is a bitter tone to this poem, especially in certain lines, such as the...

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In his poem "War is Kind," Stephen Crane takes an ironic point of view toward war in order to make his contradictory argument about the kindness of war.

Not only is there irony, but there is a bitter tone to this poem, especially in certain lines, such as the following:

Do not weep, babe,...
Because your father tumbled in the yellow trenches,
Raged at his breast, gulped and died.

The contradictory argument, the irony, here is that the father dies a terrible death and leaves the child, but somehow "war is kind." 

In the next stanza, the glorious symbol of war and courage, the eagle "with crest of red and gold," has been made a mockery by the dead soldier who falls into these "yellow trenches." So there is more irony as the glorious colors have deteriorated to yellow. 

Further, Crane points to the cruelty and futility of war that leaves children without fathers, mothers without sons, women without their lovers or husbands. Also, he points to the false patriotism--"Great is the Battle Guard"--that would make men believe that they are performing heroic deeds for their country, deeds for which mothers should be willing to sacrifice their sons for "the virtue of slaughter":

Mother whose heart hung ...
On the bright splendid shroud of your son,
So not weep.
War is kind.

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