What points would I make in a persuasive paragraph that tries to convince a student audience of the value of adding community service to its high school graduation requirements?  What points would I make in a persuasive paragraph that tries to convince a student audience of the value of adding community service to its high school graduation requirements?  

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Since they are students, my first reaction is that they are already quite busy and if they aren't busy they probably don't want to be busy. I would point out the benefits of getting job skills by volunteering, as well as letters of recommendation for jobs and college applications. I would also tell them that volunteering can often turn into paid jobs.
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I think that there are some definite points that need to be made. The most significant of these points would be that it is important for members of a high school class to set right what others have made wrong.  I think that this could be very appealing in terms of being able to make a compelling argument as to why community service is important.  The reality is that others prior to the high school group have left much in our state of being in disrepair and disrespect.  This can be changed if current and future high school students fuse together their talents and make right that which is wrong.  Another reason that could be compelling in high school community service prior to graduation would be to bond with one another as a group.  The ability to work towards an altruistic goal with other people helps to create a bond between people and this could be a very good reason to participate in community service projects prior to graduation.  Those life experiences that become so essential to reflect up while at college or in a post high school life can be made through community service participation.

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