What is the point of view in "New York Day Women" in Krik? Krak!?

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Although "New York Day Women" is largely written in first person, Danticat's story alternates between two voices.

The alternating voices (signifying conflicting points of view) demonstrate the challenges of double identity. In the story, the mother is a Haitian native and a first-generation American. We hear the voice of the daughter, who is a second-generation immigrant, as she follows her mother through the crowd. The daughter, Suzette, admires her mother but has a difficult time reconciling her Haitian heritage with her American identity.

As she observes from afar, Suzette notes that her mother often looks out of place among the New York City crowd. Her bright print dresses seem incongruent among a sea of suits, high heels, and glamorous short skirts. When her mother stops to contemplate an African print dress, Suzette silently groans,

"I think to myself, Please Ma, don't buy it. It would be just another thing I would bury in the garage or give to Goodwill."

Through Suzette's internal

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 848 words.)

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