What is the point of view of the narrator in Sense and Sensibility?

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In Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen uses what's called a third-person omniscient point of view. This is where the narrator sees all and knows all. Such a point of view gives us privileged access to the interior life of each character—their thoughts, their emotions, and their hopes and aspirations.

However, just because the narrator can tell us what's going on inside each character's head, it doesn't mean that she should give them all equal consideration. In that sense, the point of view of this novel is limited. The main focus of the narration is Elinor (who represents the "sense" mentioned in the title). This means that we come to know her far better than anyone else in the story—certainly better than the more emotional Marianne. Besides, Austen is much too good of a writer to tell us everything that's going on inside her characters' minds; there does need to be an appropriate level of ambiguity and subtlety to keep us interested.

The narrative point of view in Sense and Sensibility

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