A Rose For Emily Point Of View

What point of view does "A Rose for Emily" use and what are its advantages?

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First-person collective narrator is part of the genius of "A Rose for Emily." First-person perspective uses personal pronouns like "I" and "we." It is a useful perspective because it brings readers very close to the action through the presence of the narrator as a character. First-person can be challenging, though, in that the character who is narrator must be physically present for every part of the plot. To tell the story of a recluse like Ms. Emily, one would imagine third-person to be necessary, or that Emily would need to tell it, but Faulkner bypasses this hurdle by turning his first-person narrator into a collective "we," representing the whole town of Jefferson, Mississippi.

Individuals within the town are present to give different eyewitness accounts and to relay heard rumors about Emily. Their gossip is filtered through the narrator's voice, and so a person like Emily, who has no intimate relationships with people in the town...

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luvnie92 | Student

what a bout the the protoganist of emily in part 4?

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