What plan do Montag and Faber devise in Fahrenheit 451?

Montag and Faber devise a plan to print books and plant them in firemen's homes in order to undermine the state. Faber also gives Montag a two-way seashell so that they can stay in constant communication, especially for the purpose of countering Beatty's anti-intellectual ideas.

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When Montag first comes to Faber's apartment to talk about reading books and undermining the state, Faber is naturally suspicious: Montag is a fire fighter, something akin to a Stormtrooper in Nazi Germany. However, Montag is able to convince Faber he is serious.

At this point, Faber unveils a plan...

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When Montag first comes to Faber's apartment to talk about reading books and undermining the state, Faber is naturally suspicious: Montag is a fire fighter, something akin to a Stormtrooper in Nazi Germany. However, Montag is able to convince Faber he is serious.

At this point, Faber unveils a plan in which the two of them can print books and have them planted in firemen's homes to undermine the firemen's credibility. Montag likes this idea. Faber tells Montag to bring the $400 or $500 that he says he has saved (firemen are well paid) and he, Faber, will get in touch with the printer he knows. That way, they can implement their plan.

Montag also mentions wishing he had some way to counter all of Beatty's smooth talk against books and reading. At this point, Faber gives him an electronic seashell. It is like the seashells Millie uses to listen to her shows, but it is two-way—Montag can both listen and talk back. Faber can also hear through the seashell what is going on. Faber suggests that Montag wear it so they can stay in constant contact. This way, Faber can hear what Beatty is saying and suggest to Montag how he might respond.

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In part two, Montag visits Faber's home in the hopes that the former professor will teach him how to comprehend the information he is reading and possibly help formulate a plan to undermine the institution of the firemen. After Montag suggests to Faber that they make copies of novels and secretly distribute them throughout society, Faber elaborates on another plan: Faber suggests that they print copies of books and plant them inside firemen's homes and call in alarms on the firemen for illegally possessing books. Faber's plan would sow "seeds of suspicion" among the firemen, and the entire institution would collapse.

Immediately after suggesting the daring plan, Faber tells Montag that he was just joking and he doesn't believe it would work. Eventually, Faber ends up giving Montag a two-way communication device known as the green-bullet and gives him valuable advice during his conversation with Captain Beatty. After Montag becomes a fugitive, Faber tells him that he is heading to St. Louis, where he plans on making copies of books. Montag then joins a group of traveling intellectuals and learns how to remember complete works of literature, which he will pass onto future generations.

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Faber and Montag’s plan is to hide books in firemen’s houses to implicate them all over the country and arouse suspicion.

When Montag first meets Faber, he is intrigued by the old man.  Faber used to be an English professor before the last college closed down due to lack of students.  At first, he is suspicious of Montag.  Montag tries to ask him how many copies of various books are left, and he tells him none.  Montag tracks him down, and they have a real conversation when Montag convinces the man that he is genuine.  Then Montag shares his plan.  He wants to print extra copies of books.  Faber scoffs at him.  He has his own plan.

Now if you suggest that we print extra books and arrange to have them hidden in firemen's houses all over the country, so that seeds of suspicion would be sown among these arsonists, bravo, I'd say!" (Part 2)

When Faber first suggests the plan, he isn’t serious.  Montag is, however.  He has a list of firemen’s houses, and no love lost for the fire department.  He has lost faith in his community, and his entire worldview has been shaken.  He feels a desperate need to take action.  He tells Faber he has nothing to lose.

Faber gives Montag a small earpiece like a Seashell Radio to wear in his ear, so he can communicate with him.  Then Montag goes back, but he points out that he won't blindly follow Faber. 

"I don't want to change sides and just be told what to do. There's no reason to change if I do that." (Part 2)

Faber tells him he is wise already. He couldn't agree with Montag more!

As with most complicated plans, this one falls apart.  Montag ends up killing his boss, Fire Captain Beatty, and going on the run spectacularly from the mechanical hound, when his wife calls the fire department on him.  Meanwhile, the entire civilization seems to self-destruct around them.  Montag runs away to Faber and a group of other like-minded book lovers who pretty much just sit back and wait for the rest of them to destroy each other so they can pick up the pieces.

Bradbury’s message is hardly subtle, but it is still meaningful.  Books carry more than just our words—they carry our heritage.  They are our soul.  A soulless society like the one Montag lived in will implode, and is not worth living in anyway.

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The plan, as Faber condenses it is, "The salamander devours its own tail."  When Montag goes to Faber's home, he doesn't have a clear plan of attack.  He tells Faber that they need to print some extra copies of books.  He seems to have no plan after that, but Faber, jokingly adds that maybe they could make copies of books, plant the books in the homes of firemen, then turn in an alarm on those firemen so they'd be arrested and "the seeds of suspicion would be sown among the arsonists."  Faber balks and to convince him to help with the plan, Montag begins to rip the pages from the Bible that he has.  Faber then tells Montag that he knows a printer with an old printing press who might be able to print up a few copies of books.  Faber wants to wait until the war begins and wipes out some of the problem though.  Montag is going to go home to get some money to pay the printer, so Faber gives him the two-way radio seashell so that Faber can talk to Montag to help guide him and he can also him to what is said around Montag, particularly by Beatty. 

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When Montag goes to Faber's house, he is seeking for the answers to why books are so important and necessary.  Faber tells him that books are important for three reasons:  quality, leisure, and motivation to act.  But, he is a bit dejected because he feels that in their society, there isn't much that they can do to change the system, and bring books back.  He figures the only way to really succeed is if "the fireman structure itself could be burnt."  He says that way to do that is to

"print extra books and arrange to have them hidden in firemen's houses all over the country."

Then, they could call in the alarm on these men, and all of the firemen's houses would be burnt to the ground, because they had books in them.  That would start to undermine the system, throw everyone for a loop, and give Montag and Faber time to distribute other books, and start the wheels of change.  And, it just so happens that Montag has "a list of firemen's residences everywhere" and Faber knows an "unemployed printer" who could start printing off the books for them to plant.  So, that's the plan they start with; print some books, plant them in firemen's houses, call in the alarm on them, and watch the homes burn.  I hope that helps; good luck!

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