What pictures of autumn and winter are found in the poem "The Vagabond"?

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The vagabond is a wanderer with no fixed home. The only time he talks specifically about autumn and winter is in the third stanza.

Autumn is described here not as a beautiful season in which the leaves on the trees turn golden and the land yields its mellow fruitfulness. Instead,...

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The vagabond is a wanderer with no fixed home. The only time he talks specifically about autumn and winter is in the third stanza.

Autumn is described here not as a beautiful season in which the leaves on the trees turn golden and the land yields its mellow fruitfulness. Instead, it is pictured as a harsh time for the vagabond, a time in which silence falls because it is so chilly that the birds are no longer singing, his fingers turn blue from the cold, and the fields are frosty and white like "meal"—we might imagine some sort of lumpy white meal like cream of wheat. These are not pleasant images.

We get no description of winter but have to imagine it is even harsher than the autumn, for the vagabond says he will not yield "even" to it (perhaps alluding to death) and will keep on wandering. In both seasons, he describes coming inside to a "fireside" as a "haven" from the cold.

This depiction of autumn and winter as harsh is realistic to the experience of a vagabond, who is out in the weather most of the time, not watching it from the safety and warmth of a window.

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