What picture of society is given in the novel Frankenstein?

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amy-lepore eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by this question.  If you mean the society of Frankenstein's own family, it was a loving and carefree environment.  Victor had all he could have ever wanted in a doting mother and a father who took pains to love and educate him.  He had two brothers and Elizabeth and Justine as "sister-types"--both whom were loving and positive and full of life.  He had his childhood friend, Henry Clerval, to help him remained balanced

If you mean society as a whole outside of the family, it is a different story.  We see this mostly through the eyes of the creature, who reports that people threw things at him and beat him.  Old Man DeLacey was kind to him, but only because the man was blind.  His son chased the creature out of the house with a stick and then the entire family immediately vacated the home.

The gates of Geneva were locked every night, and plague infested the city--people were afraid of disease and of 8-foot ugly people.

We don't see society much from Victor's point of view as he was either working for years on forbidden projects or sick with fever and shunning all company. 

 

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Frankenstein

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