What is Phillip Malloy's truth in the film version of Nothing But the Truth, and how and why did his perception of the truth become so distorted?I want the answer to relate to other high school...

What is Phillip Malloy's truth in the film version of Nothing But the Truth, and how and why did his perception of the truth become so distorted?

I want the answer to relate to other high school students and their reality or perception of the truth and nothing but the truth and on the question should phillip have been true to himself

Asked on by t122976

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dftbap | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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It has commonly been said that there is "your truth, my truth, and what actually occurred."  There is so much distortion and subjectivity in the book that the truth becomes obscured and is not known, even at the end of the book.

Truth can be a very subjective situation.

"It’ s a genuine sociology precept called theThomas Theorem. Formulated in 1928 by the sociologist William Isaac Thomas, it’ s been described by one eminent scholar as “probably the single most consequential sentence ever put in print by an American sociologist.” Sometimes called the Thomas Dictum, it is accepted by many researchers as scientific fact—or at least as a powerful way of comprehending the human condition. Here it is:

If men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences."

Truth distortion can happen many ways. For example, a young man is sitting in a restaurant and the manager tells him there are a group of policeman outside the restaurant waiting to speak with him about his lack of respect.  Whether or not the young man meant any disprespect, the officer's perceive this as the truth, and thus the treatment afforded the young gentleman is that of one who is seen as disrespectful or problematic.  It could possibly even be a random person picked in the restaurant, pointed out as being rude (when no facts exist to substantiate the claim) and that person will be treated as they are perceived.  

How one perceives a situation is as important, if not more so, than the actual events of the situation.


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