What path did African Americans and their allies find and/or lose during their 1930s fight for freedom?"The whites were as miserable as their black victims, I thought. If this country can't find...

What path did African Americans and their allies find and/or lose during their 1930s fight for freedom?

"The whites were as miserable as their black victims, I thought. If this country can't find its way to a human path, if it can't inform conduct with a deep sense of life, then all of us, black as well as white, are going down the same drain."

-Richard Wright, BLACK BOY, 383

Asked on by catita06

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Wright's quote is a phenomenal one.  I think that it showed how difficult and arduous the path for African Americans were during the 1930s.  For all Americans, life was difficult.  The grips of the Great Depression were felt by all Americans.  Mere living on a daily basis proved to be an extraordinary feat.  Adding to this was that African- Americans were already living through a challenging set of conditions through racial discrimination.  Add economic disempowerment to this reality and I think that Wright's closing thought of life "going down the drain" hits the point directly.  The fight for freedom in the African- American predicament was challenged in the 1930s for many people in addition to those of color were searching for validation and a confirmation that their voice mattered.  This becomes how the opening part of the statement holds validity.  In the end, the fight for racial justice had to be placed in the context of socio- economic reality.  While people of color might have been disappointed that their demands were not being met, millions of others Americans from all backgrounds were feeling much of the same experience.

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