What passages in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird show Atticus as a lawyer?

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The best places to find passages depicting Atticus in action as a lawyer in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird are the chapters covering Tom Robinson's trial, chapters 16 through 21. One important moment of Atticus taking action as a lawyer can be seen when, during his cross-examination...

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The best places to find passages depicting Atticus in action as a lawyer in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird are the chapters covering Tom Robinson's trial, chapters 16 through 21.

One important moment of Atticus taking action as a lawyer can be seen when, during his cross-examination of Sheriff Heck Tate, Atticus asks, "Did you call a doctor, Sheriff? Did anybody call a doctor" (Ch. 17). This question and the sheriff's answer in the negative is important because without a doctor's examination, there isn't a shred of physical evidence to present to the court proving that Mayella had indeed been taken advantage of, which shows that Robinson's case should never have been brought to trial.

A second important moment occurs during Bob Ewell's testimony. After hearing Sheriff Tate testify that Mayella had been bruised on the right side of her face, Atticus asks, "Mr. Ewell, can you read and write?" (Ch. 17). After Judge Taylor overrules the objection of the prosecuting attorney, Mr. Gilmer, Ewell proceeds to write his name before the court using his left hand. Atticus has uncovered significant circumstantial evidence through his questioning because he has proven that only a man who is capable of using his left hand could have bruised Mayella's right eye while facing her, and Ewell has just proven he can use his left hand, whereas Tom Robinson is crippled in both his left arm and left hand.

Another important moment of Atticus taking action as a lawyer can be seen during his closing remarks to the jury. Scout narrates that in the middle of his speech, Atticus does the following astonishing actions:

Atticus did something I never saw him do before or since, in public or in private: he unbuttoned his vest, unbuttoned his collar, loosened his tie, and took off his coat. (Ch. 20)

Scout notes that his actions felt like the "equivalent of him standing before [the whole court] stark naked," as if he was baring his soul and showing he had nothing to hide in order to convince the jury of the truth of his words. He then commences to lay before the jury all evidence proving Robinson's innocence and ends his long and passionate speech by begging the jury to make an impartial, unbiased decision.

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