What is at least one part of Abraham Lincoln's first inauguration speech meant to calm the people of the South who are disturbed by Lincoln's election?

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When Abraham Lincoln won the presidential election in 1860, the leaders and many civilians of the southern states were very nervous. They were convinced Abraham Lincoln was going to end slavery. As a result, seven southern states seceded from the Union after Abraham Lincoln won the election.

In his first...

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When Abraham Lincoln won the presidential election in 1860, the leaders and many civilians of the southern states were very nervous. They were convinced Abraham Lincoln was going to end slavery. As a result, seven southern states seceded from the Union after Abraham Lincoln won the election.

In his first inaugural address, President Lincoln made it very clear he was not interested in ending slavery. He used a quote from one of his previous speeches where he said, “I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.” If the leaders of the southern states would have taken President Lincoln at his word, they would not have had to worry he would end slavery in the southern states. They didn’t believe him, though. They also had other concerns about slavery's long-term survival, as well as future policies concerning slavery.

In Abraham Lincoln's first inaugural address, there were messages aimed at the leaders and people of the southern states to ease their concerns regarding slavery. They weren’t willing to hear those messages.

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