What are parallelisms and what examples are presented in the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald?i have to write an essay in which I have to do biographical research and establish the...

What are parallelisms and what examples are presented in the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald?

i have to write an essay in which I have to do biographical research and establish the parallelisms presented in the novel. i would appreciate any information you can give me. thank you

Asked on by paonieves

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Well, grammatically, parallelism generally refers to a sentence structure which "matches," so to speak.  For example, "The young girl was interested in gathering flowers, pressing them in books, and using them for her scrapbook work."  This is not parallel structure:  "The young girl was interested in gathering flowers so she could press them in books and then use them in her scrapbook work." 

The tone of your question, though, implies the use of parallelism in a broader and biographical sense--as in ideas or things in the novel that are parallel to or matching Fitzgerald's real life.  If that's the case, it will be an interesting study for you, because much of what happens to Jay in The Great Gatsby does parallel the author's life.  Here are a few to get you started:

  1. Both of them were born into lower economic circumstances and managed to work themselves into affluence.
  2. Both were fairly disillusioned by the excessive lifestyles of the rich during the '20s.
  3. Both had their hearts broken by the fact that they weren't able to marry the women they loved when they wanted because they didn't have money (though, unlike Jay,  Fitzgerald does marry Zelda eventually). 

That should get you started, anyway.  There really are a lot of parallels which your research will reveal.  If you're interested, I'd also recommend a Fitzgerald short story called "The Sensible Thing" (which I've noted in a website for you, below).  The main female character is Jonquil (also a flower name, like Daisy) and the protagonist is even closer to Fitzgerald's real life than Jay Gatsby,  It may or may not be helpful to your research, but it will give you another view of parallelism between the author and his work.  Hope this helps!

 

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