What page is it when Ron Franz asked Chris McCandless to be his grandson?

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In “Chapter Six: Anza-Borrego,” Ron Franz is introduced as a kindly, “grandfatherly,” army veteran living alone in Salton City, California. Since his wife and son were killed by a drunk driver in the 1950s, Franz has been a mentor, benefactor, and parental figure to more than a dozen unofficially-adopted youths....

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In “Chapter Six: Anza-Borrego,” Ron Franz is introduced as a kindly, “grandfatherly,” army veteran living alone in Salton City, California. Since his wife and son were killed by a drunk driver in the 1950s, Franz has been a mentor, benefactor, and parental figure to more than a dozen unofficially-adopted youths. When he encounters McCandless in 1992, hitchhiking back to his desert camp from a trip to town, he decides to help the boy sort out his life. They keep each other company for several weeks, with Franz learning about McCandless’s desire to experience an “Alaskan Odyssey,” and McCandless learning leatherworking from Franz. Despite the younger man’s many “outbursts” on the nature of American society, Franz becomes attached and is concerned to see him embark on such a dangerous adventure. When McCandless finds work in South Dakota that will allow him to buy supplies for Alaska, Franz offers to drive him as far as Grand Junction, Colorado, if only for a little more time to protect and connect with the boy he knows as Alex.

The familial nature of their connection is not lost on Franz, who hopes for more. As they drive, he tells McCandless that he’d like to adopt him as his grandson (p. 62). An uncomfortable McCandless hesitates, telling Franz that they can talk about it when he returns from Alaska. The author, John Krakauer, notes the relief McCandless feels when they reach Grand Junction. “[Relief] that he had again evaded the impending threat of human intimacy, of friendship, and all the messy emotional baggage that comes with it.”

McCandless goes onward toward his fate in Alaska as Franz waits in the desert for him to come home.

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The exact page number is going to be tough for me to give you.  I do not know which edition of the book that you are looking at, and the page numbers of different editions will be slightly different.  I can get you really close though.  I am looking at a PDF version of the book, and it says that the quote that you are looking for is on page 39.  

Regardless of page number, the quote is in chapter six.  About two thirds of the way through that chapter, Chris McCandless writes a very long letter to Ronald Franz.  In the letter, McCandless encourages Franz to take up a wandering lifestyle.  If you find that section of the chapter, the grandson quote is four paragraphs before it.  The paragraph ends with the word "grandson." 

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