In 1984 what is Orwell's central focus in Julia and Winston going to O'Brien's house?What is Orwell's purpose by creating this scene? What themes are exposed, and what does he want the reader to...

In 1984 what is Orwell's central focus in Julia and Winston going to O'Brien's house?

What is Orwell's purpose by creating this scene? What themes are exposed, and what does he want the reader to feel? How are these ideas exposed?

Expert Answers
mrs-campbell eNotes educator| Certified Educator

When Julia and Winston go to O'Brien's house, it is a very exciting moment in the book.  Up until that point, for us and for Winston, the idea of a real, full-fledged rebellion against the Party just seemed like an illusion, an impossibility.  However, as they go to O'Brien's house and he tells them of the rebellion and how they can play a role, everything all of a sudden comes to a head and becomes very real.  We feel hope, for the first time.  There is hope to rebel, there is hope to change the awful system that is ruining their lives.  For the first time, we get a sense of strength and power, whereas before, Winston and Julia were pretty powerless.  Life seemed futile.

The scene is created to give us hope.  The themes of a lack of hope are exposed, and he wants the reader to feel excited and expectant.  We feel, as I mentioned above, that maybe there is a fighting chance to take down the massive and all-powerful party.  Winston's feelings that O'Brien was similar in feelings are justified, and he doesn't feel quite so crazy after all.  When they leave O'Brien's, they are happy, and so is the reader.  The purpose of this scene is to set up the expectations of success, and to make us feel like hope is possible.

As you read on, it will become clear whether or not success is really a reality for Winston and Julia, or whether the meeting was just a ruse to give them a false sense of hope.  I hope that those thoughts helped; good luck!