What is one theme of 1984 by George Owell? Give a brief analysis for this book?

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'There is no place for the individual in a totalitarian society.'

Indeed this is the case of Winston, then Julia , who for a moment kicked against the system before being absorbed back into it again. When the book states that Winston "loved" Big Brother it is clear to...

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'There is no place for the individual in a totalitarian society.'

Indeed this is the case of Winston, then Julia, who for a moment kicked against the system before being absorbed back into it again. When the book states that Winston "loved" Big Brother it is clear to the reader that all of his individuality has been perfectly effaced - through both brainwashing and betrayal.

The same idea reformulated:

'Government should be at the service of the individual and not the other way around.'

 

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One simple theme is that the past does not exist and can be created by those who control the government and the media.  I think I've written this before, but here's what the book tells us.  "Who controls the present, controls the past; who controls the past controls the future."  Very few of us know much history; most know almost none.  In 1984 they go through the trouble of "replacing" the facts of history when they need to.  If, for instance, the Democrats are in power and in control of the media, they can accuse the Republicans of almost every evil in the past ... and who knows?  (Sounds a little like "Animal Farm" too.)  A good current example of another use:  did the policies of FDR end the depression?  I have always been told that they did, but am now reading that they had very little to do with it and that WWII was more significant.

If there is a theme, it is a reminder to us to KNOW and not just "believe."

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