What is one inference I can make about a character in the story "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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An inference that can be made about a character from Vonnegut's "Harrison Bergeron" is that derived from the actions of Harrison once he escapes; namely, that power is corruptive.

When Harrison escapes from prison, he comes to the television station, and feeling his superiority, he takes over the station, shouting,

"I am the Emperor! ...Do you hear? I am the Emperor! Everybody must do what I say at once!" He stamped his foot and the studio shook.
"Even as I stand here--" he bellowed, "crippled, hobbled, sickened--I am a greater ruler than any man who ever lived! Now watch me become what I can become!"

Clearly, having been unjustly imprisoned causes Harrison to revolt and seek redress. But, when he finds himself in control of the studio and throws off his handicaps, his sense of power becomes corruptive because he names himself emperor:

"I am the greater ruler than any man who ever lived! Now watch me become what I can become!" 

Then, he declares that he will select his Empress, and challenges one of the women to dare to rise. A beautiful ballerina comes to him and they leap through the air "in an explosion of joy and grace" as they express their superiority.

 

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