The Veldt Questions and Answers
by Ray Bradbury

Start Your Free Trial

What narrative conventions does Bradbury use in his short story "The Veldt"?

Expert Answers info

D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2016

write10,935 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

When we talk about narrative convention, the first question we want to ask is from whose point of view the story is being told.

In the case of "The Veldt," almost the entire story is told through the experiences of George Hadley. This limits what we as readers know because, until the very end, we only see what George sees. His, too, is the only consciousness we enter. For example, we learn his thoughts as he ponders his children's obsession with the veldt:

He chewed tastelessly on the meat that the table had cut for him. Death thoughts. They were awfully young, Wendy and Peter, for death thoughts.

However, we never know what is going on in Wendy and Peter's minds.

This narrative convention of limiting the point of view to one character helps build tension and suspense. We know something is wrong with Wendy and Peter, but until the end, even though we suspect, we are not certain they have arranged to have the lions kill their parents.

At the end of story, the narrative becomes omniscient,...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 831 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

mwestwood eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2006

write16,150 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences






Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial